Help spread the word for our Virtual Open Day at the Centre for Journalism

Calling all Centre for Journalism students and graduates.  We're holding our first Virtual Open Day tomorrow evening as we try to find the next generation of lucky students to join the CfJ family - and we need your help in publicising it. 

We'll be livestreaming through our Youtube channel from 6.40pm on Tuesday 15 October to show prospective students and parents what life in this busy department is like, explain the admissions process, and demonstrate with real case studies the kinds of careers that can lie ahead. 

We’ll be looking in detail at our accredited BA, MA and Year in Journalism programmes, and previewing our brand new Television and Digital Video Production undergraduate programme that starts in 2020.

Sometimes the fight for press freedom starts in a Dartford car park

Today is World Press Freedom Day.
Pity nobody told Dartford Borough Council Press Officer Lewis Kirnon.
As the clock struck midnight to usher in the day on which we honour those who fight for the right to bear witness to democracy, Mr Kirnon was ensuring precisely the opposite happened – by refusing two of our students entry to the borough’s election count.

Covering a count is something of a rite of passage for CfJ students. Through the years, hundreds of them have done that familiar all-night stint at general elections and local elections across the county. They have provided footage for ITV, the BBC and KMTV, as well as copy for newspapers and web sites across the county. They are well trained in the dos and don’ts, both technically and editorially. They know what to film and what not to film. They understand the law and Ofcom’s regulations inside out.
So it was with a degree of excitement that third year undergrad Jessica Sharp and her second year colleague Chloe Rose set off to cover the Dartford count as KMTV interns yesterday night.

Mission accomplished: project hand-in day

Project deadline days are legendary at the Centre for Journalism.

Tears, tantrums, tales of woe - and the wild staring eyes of students who haven't been to sleep for more than 24 hours - are reliable indicators that the submission of this all important piece of work is imminent.

And each year, the academic staff grab whispered conversations in the corridor to compare notes about some of the amazing work that is nearing completion.

So yesterday, as the clock ticked down towards 5pm, we decided to capture at least some of the mania with a time-lapse camera in the Year 3 newsroom.

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